Monday, January 28, 2008

The Dominica Ebook

January has been a record month for book sales at Living Dominica. It is gratifying when lots of people find their way to our web page and choose to purchase our book. I suppose when the weather up north is cold and miserable, the book is even more appealing. Thank you to all you book buyers!

It is interesting to me the number of emails we get from people looking at a move to Dominica based on my eBook. We have even heard from people prepared to invest in property sight unseen! I always discourage this and tell them to come down, and get a feel for the island. I think that renting here for a while, allowing Dominica to seep into your pores before buying, is an excellent idea. You have to be comfortable with the differences to make a go of it here.

For instance, one time I was encouraging our daughter to join us in living on Dominica. "But what do I do when it is 3AM and I am dying for a cheeseburger?" she replied. Suggesting that she consider making her own was not appealing. Clearly, she is not ready to live here even though she finds the island dazzling.

If you are not ready to leave behind easy access to cheeseburgers, you are not ready for Dominica.

Dominica is a land of such promise. The natural beauty is amazing, and the people are warm and welcoming. It is an easy place with which to fall in love. But it also will serve up its share of frustrations and difficulty. I recently heard the following from a person who owns a home here:

"I've experienced some of the most beautiful as well as most horrifying times on this unique island which seems to be constantly calling for drama. I still love Dominica and consider her my home, although I am presently living on another Caribbean island. Whenever I visit, which is at least 3 - 4 times a year, and watch from the plane as Dominica's tall green body appears mystically through the clouds, I know I am coming home.

Dominica can give you everything, but also take everything."
I guess that says it all, doesn't it?

livingdominica: you probably know that Dominica's indigenous name is Waitikubuli, meaning Tall is Her Body. Isn't that lovely...

4 comments:

zooms said...

Is your header growing Jen?

Diane Corriette said...

I have loved reading your blog and sad for you that you have to leave. Yesterday I started a new group for Dominicans and would be honored if you would join us and tell everyone about your blog
Its at http://dominicans.ning.com
I hope you choose to join us and tell others.
Living in the UK I realize just how little I know about the land of my parents and I want to change that in 2008
blessings
Diane

Israel said...

I am shocked Jen that you have had to leave Dominica under those circumstances. Take heart; it is not personal. There are those of us who live abroad who have had our fair share of sordid experiences in our own homeland.

But as you well know, it is never about the land, which always remains majestic as our humanity sometimes decays.

Israel

Trini said...

Hello Jen,

I stumbled across your blog yesterday May 5th, so you are perhaps now back in the US.

Funny but so many things you said about Dominica, can also be said about Jamaica.The sun is shinny all lovely and bright, but lifes' total drama continues day in and day out. As they say here " meh ahh tired"

I moved here two years ago with my Jamaican husband from Washington DC. and oh what a ride. Now I grew up in New York city right.
I figured I would have zero problems as I was born in Trini and grew migrated when i was 8 to the US,. So no problem was my take.

When Culture shock hit me by month two I had no idea of what to do, but cry.I was in bed by 7pm for the first 4 months as I was on brain overload. Sort of like a new job.
So fast track two years later, and I have now decided to put sugar in my lemonade. So I am now getting Transition Service of the ground, where I assist people or companies who are thinking aobut moving employees to JA.
I also just completed my first E-book and will call it my Resource Guide for a move to JA.So onward I go, as so many of my pals have bolted in less than 2 years form JA.
The country is beautiful but the poverty and unstableness can break your bones.Not to mention always being sick. I had the worst case of Dengue fever last Oct. and I'm still trying to get my immune system back on track. Hell I tell you.

Good luck in the US as things are hot this year.its an election year so lordy.

Dale